Newport news dating services

It is ordered by the colony of the court, that he whoso is absent from their meeting in public, or set up any other meeting, shall pay 10s a person every day. He was a Baptist minister and was among those that were persecuted in the Boston Colony and so fled to Rhode Island to find the freedom of thought denied them in Mass. On July 21, 1651 he and John Clarke and Obediah Holmes were thrown into prison in Boston for preaching and on July 31 he was sentenced to pay a fine or be publicly whipped.

On the same date he was elected treasurer of Newport,and held this office for three years, and in May 1647 he was elected general treasurer of the Colony, and served in this capacity until . Elder John is buried in the row nearest the swamp in the end grave to the left as one stands facing the swamp. Each of the twenty seven graves is indicated by a field stone some 14 inches in width, appearing four to eight inches above the ground set at the head while a smaller stone marks the foot of the grave. In 1658, 1659, 1662, 1663 he was a Commissioner, and was a Deputy to the General Court in 1667, 16, representing Westerly during the two latter terms.

and sister, Sam’l and Tase Hubbard, my hearty love rememb’d unto yo. I wod not have yo think yt I repent me of my coming to N. for it doth not, for I believe if I had staid there I sho’d never have been that weh now I see to my comfort and I hope it will be for my soul’s good. The next day he fell sick at a friend’s house near Boston and within ten days died, being then nearly sixty years old. _____________________________ From: Elder John Crandall of Rhode Island and His Descendants, by John Cortland Crandall, New Woodstock, New York, 1949 , Colonial pioneer, First Baptist Elder, Deputy Commissioner, and statesman of Newport and Westerly, Rhode Island, the head of the Crandall family in America, was born in Monmouthshire, England, on the line between England and Wales in 1612. He came to Boston within a very few years after the landing of the Pilgrims, in 1634.

Another brother, John Cooper, was living in London as late as 1680. He was resolved not to pay the fine, but after six or seven days imprisonment, on the day appointed for the whipping another paid it for him and he was released. He had a half a square assigned to him at Westerly in 1661, was deputy in 1667 and again in 1670-71, He died in Newport having moved there on account of the Indian War.

For twenty-three years he was a member of the First Baptist Church at Newport. 7, 1651 “to visit the bretherin who was imprisoned in Boston jayl for witnessing the truth of baptizing believers only, viz,. In 1665 Tase Hubbard first, and a little later Samuel Hubbard himself, became convinced of their obligation to observe the seventh day, instead of the first, as the weekly Sabbath. He found abundant consolation in religion, nevertheless, and in correspondence with the friends still remaining, among whom were numbered Roger Williams and John Thornton of Providence, and Governor Leete of Connecticut. Samuel Hubbard was evidently a man of devout spirit, loyal to religious convictions and kindly disposed to all mankind. Samuel Hubbard, born 1610 at Mendlesham, Co, Suffolk, England; came to Salem, Oct. Tase Cooper, born 1608 in England; came to Dorchester June 9, 1634 and to Windsor 1635; died after 1697, probably at Newport or Westerly. Samuel Clark (1675 to 1761) married Hannah Wilcox and had my 5th great grandmother Hannah Clark. Jeremiah or Jeremy Clarke, of Newport, RI, son of William (7), baptized at East Farleigh, co. Frances (Latham) (Dungan) Clarke married thirdly, on or before 18 Jan. 1639/40 he was selected to supply the treasurer’s place “till his returne from the Dutch.” On 10 Mar. Across from the house in the old orchard field is the original cemetery, in which twenty seven bodies are buried. They further concluded that a large native field granite boulder with a bronze plaque properly lettered, embedded in the same would be most suitable.

The issue that I found was Volume I, Issue 3, dated July 1891, R. When you send to us, send to my brother Thomas Hubbard’s house in Freeman lane near Horsley down in Southwark, London. After his arrival in England he wrote to Governor Winthrop a letter from London (dated 1644, but written, evidently, after Jan. John is buried in the Common Burying Ground in Newport, RI. Through the seven sons of Elder Crandall the name became a common one and the family numerous in Rhode Island.” (From “Representative men and old families of Rhode Island”.) ………

Hammett Tilley, Editor and Publisher, Newport, RI, Pages 172-178. 22, 1644-5, as the above letter shows) in which he speaks of his invention concerning longitude.” In 1652 he was a minister in Cobdock Co., Suffolk, and in 1654 he was living in Ardleagh; His death occurred in 1660. He is my First Cousin 7 times removed (Being the son of Johnathan Maxson and Content Rogers.) John married Tacy Lucy Rogers (1715-1753) who was my 5th Great Grandaunt (being the daughter of Jonathan Rogers Jr and Judith Potter) Here’s a link to John’s memorial page on Findagrave.com: CLICK HERE FOR LINK On the Rogers sides of their families John and Tacy were not only husband and wife, but first cousins as well. If you’re familiar with this site, as a member (which is free) you can go on a memorial of a person and if there is no photo of their headstone posted, you can request a photo. Elder John Crandall died before November 29, 1676 at Newport where he was sojourning on account of the Indian War (King Philip’s War).

Isaac Backus in 1777, when he prepared his history of the Baptists. You then get an email alerting you that your request has ben fulfilled. John Crandall was the minister of the Salem church, but he adopted the opinions of the Baptists, which were very obnoxious to the Congregationalists, and in the autumn of 1635 he was dismissed as pastor.

They were extant in 1830, but as early as 1852 had been lost. Hence my cleaning out my email inbox and find old John there. As did so many others of the early Baptists of New England he determined to settle in the Narragansett country.

Leave a Reply